Contributing Scholars

On this page you will find a list of scholars who have participated in the UMass projects surrounding Deerfield history in recent decades. This is not an exhaustive list; numerous scholars, students, and assistants have contributed to this work as well!

 

Dr. Margaret Bruchac

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

UPenn Faculty Page

Scholar Profile on Academia.edu

Work Related to Pocumtuck Heritage:

2012. Margaret M. Bruchac and Siobhan M. Hart. Materiality and Autonomy in the Pocumtuck Homeland. Archaeologies, Journal of the World Archaeological Congress 8(3):293-312.

2011. Margaret M. Bruchac. Revisiting Pocumtuck History in Deerfield: George Sheldon’s Vanishing Indian Act. Historical Journal of Massachusetts 39(1/2) (June 2011):30-77. 75th Commemorative Issue.

2010. Margaret M. Bruchac, Siobhan Hart, and H. Martin Wobst, eds. Indigenous Archaeologies: A Reader in Decolonization. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Researcher Bio:

Dr. Margaret (Marge) Bruchac, of Abenaki Indian descent, is a scholar, performer, and historical consultant who specializes in interpretations and representations of northeastern Native American Indian peoples, from the colonial era to the present. (You can find this and more in-depth information about her at http://www.maligeet.net/Home_Page.html)

 

Dr. Robert Paynter

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, UMass Amherst

Read Selected Works from UMass Bepress

Work Related to Pocumtuck Heritage:

Paynter, R. (2002). Time in the Valley: Narratives About Rural New England. Current Anthropology, 43(S4), S85–S101. http://doi.org/10.1086/341105

Researcher Bio:

“I study historical archaeology, something I think of as the investigation of the global development, spread, and resistance to capitalism and European expansion. I start this work with the material culture – the artifacts and landscapes – produced and consumed by people caught up in these processes. These material traces are then woven with documentary traces to develop holistic understandings of how the world of today came into being. I have found it crucial to read the theoretical and historical perspectives on capitalism and conquest developed by authors positioned variously throughout the globe, bringing perspectives of people who know the various political economies and cultural forms of the peoples of Africa , the Americas , and Europe . This global focus frames my field work on sites in Western Massachusetts in the US , including work in Deerfield Village in Deerfield and at the W.E.B. Du Bois Boyhood Homesite in Great Barrington. This said, I encourage and sponsor students interested in these local areas as well as those interested in studying capitalism and conquest elsewhere around the globe. Finally, I hold to the idea that historical archaeology is best understood within a broad anthropological perspective, one that compares and contrasts the workings of the modern world with those of archaeologically known ancient and pre-state societies. I find I can best do this work with colleagues in the Anthropology department as well as people interested in Native American Indian studies, Afro American Studies, and Women’s Studies. Reflecting my concerns, I teach our introduction to general anthropology for non-majors, Anthro 100 Human Nature, co-teach courses on Native studies, and co-direct our Summer Field School in Archaeology.” (Text from Dr. Paynter’s Bepress page)

 

Dr. H. Martin Wobst

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, UMass Amherst

Profile with Intellectual Property in Cultural Heritage project

Work Related to Pocumtuck Heritage:

2010. Margaret M. Bruchac, Siobhan Hart, and H. Martin Wobst, eds. Indigenous Archaeologies: A Reader in Decolonization. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Researcher Bio:

I am interested in theory in archaeology, particularly in how artifacts help to constitute individuals and social groups. This has me investigate the present (“the archaeology of us”) to expose how strange the materiality of capitalism is, and to look at societies other than my own, to expose alternatives to the material logic of western society (both in the past and in the present). I am also interested in the theoretical implications of methods in archaeology—how they affect what questions can be answered, and how they will be answered. In the context of this project, I am interested in oral history (and how it affected by publication), in indigenous copy-right on their cultural patrimony, and in designing research and publication contexts in which descendant populations are in control and benefit. (Text from IPINCH profile)